What Does Stochastic Mean in Machine Learning?

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The behavior and performance of many machine learning algorithms are referred to as stochastic.
Stochastic refers to a variable process where the outcome involves some randomness and has some uncertainty. It is a mathematical term and is closely related to “randomness” and “probabilistic” and can be contrasted to the idea of “deterministic.

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Orbital resonance in Neptune’s moons

Phys.com published an article a couple days ago NASA finds Neptune moons locked in ‘dance of avoidance’. The article is based on the scholarly paper Orbits and resonances of the regular moons of Neptune.
The two moons closest to Neptune, named Naiad and Thalassa, orbit at nearly the same distance, 48,224 km for Naiad and 50,074 km for Thalassa.

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Wikipedia Page View Statistics Late 2007 and Beyond

The {wikipediatrend} package
This blog post covers the major release of the {wikipediatrend} package – namely version 2.1.4.
❤ Thanks to all CRAN people ❤
The History
Introduction
{wikipediatrend} dates back to late 2014. It is my first R package making it to CRAN and at this time it was the first and only R package to allow
access to Wikipedia page view statistics from within R.

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Re-exporting the magrittr pipe operator

… or how I stoped worrying and wrote a blog post to remember it ad infinitum.
Magrittr’s pipe operator is one of those newish R-universe features that I
really want to have around whenever I put some lines into an R-console.
This is even TRUE when writing a package.
So the first thing I do is put magrittr into the DESCRIPTION file and add
an __imports.

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Why Artificial Intelligence Research is Still Relevant

As a college student, you will often be required to submit a written research paper in whatever field. For such a paper, you will have to analyze different data and come up with a hypothesis. This is where artificial intelligence comes into play. It helps you analyze data and make predictions based on your findings.

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The hardest logarithm to compute

Suppose you want to compute the natural logarithms of every floating point number, correctly truncated to a floating point result. Here by floating point number we mean an IEEE standard 64-bit float, what C calls a double. Which logarithm is hardest to compute?
We’ll get to the hardest logarithm shortly, but we’ll first start with a warm up problem.

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Geographic projections and transformations

Introduction
This workbook outlines key concepts and functions related to map projections — also referred to as coordinate reference systems (CRSs) — and transformation of geographic data from one projection to another.
It is based on the open source book Geocomputation with R, and Chapter 6 in particular.

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Deriving Mean-Field Variational Bayes

“Mean-Field Variational Bayes” (MFVB), is similar to expectation-maximization (EM) yet distinct in two key ways:
We do not minimize (text{KL}big(q(mathbf{Z})Vert p(mathbf{Z}vertmathbf{X}, theta)big)), i.e. perform the E-step, as [in the problems in which we employ mean-field] the posterior distribution (p(mathbf{Z}vertmathbf{X}, theta)) “is too complex to work with,”™ i.

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Geocoding Paradise Papers Addresses In Neo4j To Build Interactive Geographical Data Visualizations

This post explores how to build spatial data visualizations using address data from the Paradise Papers leak of offshore corporations and the people connected to them. First, we geocode all addresses in the leaked data, then build a heatmap and interactive map for exploring the data of offshore legal entities.

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