25 Case Study Examples Every Marketer Should See

The saying “lead by example” is important in politics and leadership roles — and it’s also critical in marketing.
Sure, you can tell potential customers your marketing team is the best at running YouTube campaigns or effectively increasing a website’s cost-per-acquisition (CPA), but until you offer examples, they’re going to have a hard time believing you.

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3 Reasons Why SEO’s Are Upset About Google’s Rel=nofollow Announcement

To understand what rel=nofollow is, we’ll start with an example.
Let’s say I’m a Wikipedia editor, and I’ve recently written a page about zebras. My page is getting hundreds of views, and is ranking on page one of Google for the search term, “Zebra”.
Following the success of my Wikipedia page, I get an email in my inbox.

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Learning from users faster using machine learning

I had an interesting idea a few weeks ago, best explained through an example. Let’s say you’re running an e-commerce site (I kind of do) and you want to optimize the number of purchases.
Let’s also say we try to learn as much as we can from users, both using A/B tests but also using just basic slicing and dicing of the data.

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Reusable Blocks are the best thing about Gutenberg

What are reusable blocks and why do you want to use them?
This can best be explained by an example. Over at 7 Generation Games, we have a new project under way to create organize the hundreds of videos, presentations and activities we’ve developed with our games into a teacher resource site. Most of these fall into one of a few categories. For example, we have 19 math videos from Fish Lake.

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How much compute do we need to train generative models?

Update (09/01/17): The post is written to be somewhat silly and numbers are not meant to be accurate. For example, there is a simplifying assumption that training time scales linearly with the # of bits to encode the output; and 5000 is chosen arbitrarily given only that the output’s range has 65K*3 dimensions and each takes one of 256 integers.
Discriminative models can take weeks to train.

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“If you deprive the robot of your intuition about cause and effect, you’re never going to communicate meaningfully.” – Pearl ’18

In a paper at NIPS ’15, Judea Pearl and co. put together a toy example when all of the standard multi-armed bandit (MAB) algorithms fail. The paper shows that a MAB algorithm can do worse than random guessing, how to overcome the problem in one such case, and raises questions that need to be addressed when standard MAB algorithms are used in practice.

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Anagram frequency

An anagram of a word is another word formed by rearranging its letters. For example, “restful” and “fluster” are anagrams.
How common are anagrams? What is the largest set of words that are anagrams of each other? What are the longest words which have anagrams?
You’ll get different answers to these questions depending on what dictionary you use.

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Just evaluating a polynomial: how hard could it be?

The previous post looked at an example of strange floating point behavior taking from book End of Error. This post looks at another example.
This example, by Siegfried Rump, asks us to evaluate
333.75 y6 + x2 (11 x2y2 – y6 – 121 y4 – 2) + 5.5 y8 + x/(2y)
at x = 77617 and y = 33096.
Here we evaluate Rump’s example in single, double, and quadruple precision.

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