4 Data Science Conferences to Attend in Asia

Previously, I’ve written posts about 2019 and 2020 data science conferences to attend. Researching for both of those posts have given me a fair amount of knowledge on conferences happening in different regions around the world. In this article, I’m going to cover 5 data science conferences in Asia that you should consider attending in 2020.

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5 Data Science Conferences to Attend in Asia

Previously, I’ve written posts about 2019 and 2020 data science conferences to attend. Researching for both of those posts have given me a fair amount of knowledge on conferences happening in different regions around the world. In this article, I’m going to cover 5 data science conferences in Asia that you should consider attending in 2020.

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Gender and verbs across 100,000 stories: a tidy analysis

Previously in this series
Examining the arc of 100,000 stories
I was fascinated by my colleague Julia Silge’s recent blog post on what verbs tend to occur after “he” or “she” in several novels, and what they might imply about gender roles within fictional work. This made me wonder what trends could be found across a larger dataset of stories.

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Congressional PageRank – Analyzing US Congress With Neo4j and Apache Spark · William Lyon

As we saw previously, legis-graph is an open source software project that imports US Congressional data from Govtrack into the Neo4j graph database. This post shows how we can apply graph analytics to US Congressional data to find influential legislators in Congress.

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What digits should you bet on in Super Bowl squares?

My new office introduced me to a betting game I wasn’t previously familiar with: Super Bowl squares. It’s played with a ten-by-ten grid, like this one from printyourbrackets.com:
Each row and column gets an assortment of digits from 0-9 representing each team’s score, and each person playing the game (after putting in some money) adds their initials to one of the boxes.

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The ‘knight on an infinite chessboard’ puzzle: efficient simulation in R

Previously in this series:
The “lost boarding pass” puzzle
The “deadly board game” puzzle
I’ve recently been enjoying The Riddler: Fantastic Puzzles from FiveThirtyEight, a wonderful book from 538’s Oliver Roeder. Many of the probability puzzles can be productively solved through Monte Carlo simulations in R.

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